Smart Nonprofits Know How to Delegate
November 12, 2020

Delegation ideally gives nonprofit executives time to focus on mission critical tasks and provides growth opportunities to staffers. However, you need to approach delegation strategically. This means assigning the right tasks to the right staffers — and following up on assigned work to ensure it’s completed to your standards.

Projects and People

First, consider potential tasks that could be delegated. You should try to devote your time to the projects that are the most valuable to your organization and can best benefit from your talents. For example, public speaking engagements and meetings with major donors are probably best left to you and other upper-level executives. On the other hand, prime delegation candidates are tasks that frequently reoccur, such as sending membership renewal notices, and jobs that require a specific skill in which you have minimal or no expertise, such as reconciling bank accounts.

Before you delegate a task to an employee, consider the person’s main job responsibilities and experience and how those correlate with the project. At the same time, keep in mind that employees may welcome opportunities to test their wings in a new area or take on greater responsibility. Before assigning new tasks, check staffers’ schedules to confirm that they actually have time to do the job well.

Making and Managing the Assignment

When handing off a task, be clear about goals, expectations, deadlines and details. Explain why you chose the individual and what the project means to the organization as a whole. Also let employees know if they have any latitude to bring their own methods and processes to the task. A fresh pair of eyes might see a new and better way of accomplishing it.

Keep in mind that delegation doesn’t mean dumping a project on someone and then washing your hands of it. Ultimately, you’re responsible for the task’s completion, even if you assign it to someone else. So stay involved by monitoring the employee’s progress and providing coaching and feedback as necessary. Remember, however, there’s a fine line between remaining available for questions and micromanaging.

Credit Where Credit Is Due

A good delegator never takes credit for someone else’s work. Be sure you generously — and publicly — give credit where credit is due. This could mean verbal praise in a meeting, a note of thanks in a newsletter or a letter to the person’s manager.

Contact us for more ideas about managing your organization efficiently and cost-effectively.

© 2020

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